18

June

What is your “happy hat”?

Friday June 18, 2021


Last week while I was volunteering at the local charity shop, I put on a sailors/captain’s hat and wore it all day. I noticed that after a while I forgot I had it on, but other volunteers and customers would comment by smiling, saying Hello sailor, Captain my Captain, Ships ahoy, Anchors away and other comments.

It was interesting that I felt no different but everyone seeing me only saw the hat.

A woman who has quite a prominent birthmark on her face, who I met says she has forgotten about it until  people stare or ask her about it.

A neighbour who has no left arm due to a car accident many decades ago often forgets that people seeing that she has no left arm may be shocked, but it is normal for her. She does not like, when she is out shopping, and she wants to buy something, and people stare and ask so many questions that it can be hard for her to shop.

With a mental illness; it can be the opposite because we may be struggling but have on our smiley happy face, so people only see that and are unaware of the turmoil underneath.

Sometimes when I am feeling low people say how well I look as I try hard not to show my real feelings. Other times when I feel OK people say I look so tired.

I wonder what metaphorical hat do you wear that others notice while ignoring the real you? How do you cope, or does it not bother you? Are you aware of other people’s hats or masks (not covid)?

Leah
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above, please feel free to post a comment below.


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