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26

December


Remembering What You're Made Of. Saturday December 26, 2015

Have you ever noticed that one of the elements of depression is a sickening obsession with your own inner world? It's like you can't bear to be inside your head but you're equally too terrified to leave it and look outward.

Well maybe looking at yourself like this today might just help to shift that balance somewhat:

Have you ever considered that every single particle inside your body has been in existence for billions of years? Look at your skin. It was once part of a star, far, far from here, in another place and time. Those particles are taking a momentary rest in a you-shaped part of the universe before moving on to become soil, daisies and in the future, perhaps even more stars.

The gift you have now is the life-long lease of your own special part of the universe. It's one little bit of it that's all yours, and when you're gone, the stuff that was previously you will slowly scatter throughout the galaxies. Particles don't die. They just mutate and migrate.

With this so called ownership of our particles the human condition brings us both shame and pride alike. We are tenants bearing a great responsibility for our homestead. We understand that what we do with it affects not only our own plot, but everything around it. Sometimes the responsibility can get too much.

What if you were to make it your purpose, with this gift, to tread a life long journey along the Learning-To-Live-Better road? Arriving at Destination Perfection is not the aim. Continually moving forwards along that road is. Always remember that you are an everlasting work in progress. Just like the universe you are a part of.

Anna
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.


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Comments

Hopeful One Sat, Dec 26th 2015 @ 7:28am

Hi Anna- what a wonderful idea to carry along today and after. We are not only the tenants ,but dare I say , the landlords of this space in the universe that we call self. So we have a dual responsibility , not only to be good tennants but good landlords too . The mental health of this self depends on a healthy relationship between the two.

A Boxing Day laugh ( for a humourous relationship exists between this tennant and landlord)

An 80-year-old man went for his annual check up and the doctor said, " For your age you're in the best shape I've seen." The old man replies, "Yes It comes from clean living. I know I live a good, clean, spiritual life." The doctor asks , "What makes you say that?" The old man replies , "If I didn't live a good, clean life the Lord wouldn't turn the bathroom light on for me every time I get up in the middle of the night." The doc is concerned. "You mean when you get up in the night to go to the bathroom, the Lord Himself turns on the light for you?" "Yep," the old man says. The doctor doesn't say anything but when the old man's wife came in for her check up, he feels he has to let her know what her husband said. "I just want you to know," the doctor says to her . "Your husband's in fine physical shape but I'm worried about his mental state . He told me that every night when he gets up to go to the bathroom, the Lord turns the light on for him." "He what?" she exclaims. "He said every night when he gets up to go to the bathroom, the Lord turns the light on for him." "Aha! So he's the one who's been peeing in the refrigerator every night.!"

the room above the garage Sat, Dec 26th 2015 @ 10:37am

Hello HO, I know what your made of and I do appreciate it. You never fail to bring me a smile...loving this one! Reminds me of my brother who used to sleepwalk...
Anna this is a great message, brings me perspective and makes me feel less responsible in s good way. Thank you.

Mary Sat, Dec 26th 2015 @ 11:04am

What a great blog. A real sense of perspective. Thank you.

The Gardener Sat, Dec 26th 2015 @ 11:34am

I spend my life learning to live better, Anna - how to deal and obviate difficult situations - managing my life so important things get done with the little energy left by sleepless nights and an increasingly demanding husband. This morning he's done nothing but moan every time a door is open. He is exceedingly comfortable and warm, coffee, cakes and good meals provided at regular hours. Different subject - I hope those of you who were dreading Christmas enjoyed yourselves, or, at least, it was better than you hoped. Ours was alarming. I mentioned we were invited to our organist's house for lunch - and one goes there with trepidation (although his company is usually outstanding). I also said they live a 'menage a trois', most weird, and that the woman is bone idle. We got there - she opened the door 'you're far too early'. We said we'd been told to follow the organist after mass, which we did. He turned up over an hour later. They'd been out the night before, home around 2a.m. Madame then slept till 11.30 she said proudly. She'd obviously been pretty drunk the night before. The other man was doing most of the cooking. Our host had got up and seen to the fires, then gone and played the organs brilliantly for mass. As the church has no money for a professional organ maintenance man the organist himself does it - it's a very special musical instrument. He got home, was obviously got at - and went into a terrifying melt-down situation, lasted about half and hour. It was shocking and sad - he was obviously totally overwrought - they do B & B which he deals with by himself, and he will play the organ x times over the festive season. Things calmed down - we did not get a drink till 2 p.m. Mr TG was very hungry - he has to eat little and often. An interesting American woman was also a guest, things redeemed themselves and the meal ended peacefully. I don't know if anybody reads Aesop's fables - one about a frog and a log - too boring, so he swapped him for something livelier (wanted a King) the next choice gobbled him all up. So, Christmas day was livelier than expected in an unpleasant manner, and today is such that, christian feelings or not, I'm going to keep well away from my husband otherwise my own 'melt-down' can't be far away. A gleam, as France does not have boxing day, I've got my cleaner and portable phones mended! Anna's blog, and 'looking outwards', I do try. But the next person who says 'I must have a life of my own' does it at their own risk.

Mrs Jul A Non Sat, Dec 26th 2015 @ 4:00pm

Hello Gardener. I do find the French elderly country folk indomitable as far as staying up all hours at parties is concerned and then they have the capacity to sleep until very late the next morning. Our village is dead on January the 1st. The residents (mostly over 60 and some well into their 90s) are up all night on new years eve but sleep all day on the 1st. They will do this at weddings too. They just sit around talking and drinking and never look at their watches or yawn like we do. I am sorry your lunch yesterday started badly. Turning up too early even though you have arrived at the time stated, is a big sin in our village. If Madame is not ready with the food, no one can stay let alone sit down at the table. It's far better to arrive very late. Julia

Down the well Sat, Dec 26th 2015 @ 12:01pm

This is a beautiful blog Anna, thank you very much, really enjoyed reading it and feeling starry now ???? TG I send you love for your struggles, and love to everyone else x

Down the well Sat, Dec 26th 2015 @ 12:02pm

Those questions marks should be a smile, guess it doesn't translate!

The Gardener Sat, Dec 26th 2015 @ 6:06pm

Dear Mrs Jul A Anon - English habit of arriving the 'polite' 15 minutes late in UK dies hard. How many times we have turned up at a major French 'do' at least half an hour after the time on invite and find tables not laid and not a drink in sight! The invite yesterday was with English! One of whom is diabetic, ergo, in theory, has to eat reasonably regularly. We've given lots of major parties in France, and, except for some notable exceptions they arrive on time. As I am noted for my spectacular buffets (excuse showing off) they're probably worried food will run out.

LillyPet Sun, Dec 27th 2015 @ 5:16am

Thank you for a fascinating blog Anna. I find the gift of life endlessly awesome. Of all the forms of life that exist in this moment in time our awareness momentarily occupies the body we look out from. We are able to be concious of our own behaviour and the effect we have, not only on others and our environment, but on our ownsrlves. We have an infinite number of choices in each moment and to reflect on making more choices that improve what is within our circle of influence is truly an amazing gift. Thank you for the inspiration you have shared with us. LP :)

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