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26

February


The Shadow of the Demon. Monday February 26, 2018

My first proper job was with the Library Service of Surrey County Council. It was also one of the happiest times of my life. As part of the role, I was exposed to books I may never have otherwise seen. One of my favourites was one aimed at first-time parents. It was called, "Baby Taming."

Even after 40 years, I can still see the inside cover illustration. It was of a monstrous shadow cast tall - up and across the wall - filling the scene... and filling the heart with dread. Yet, follow the shadow to its source and you would have seen a harmless cartoon baby crawling into the room. The baby was simply seen in a light that exaggerated its shadow out of all proportion.

Thus the key point of the book was made with one simple illustration: parenthood may seem terrifying, but with the right advice the fear of parenthood could be conquered through taming baby! Why? Because baby wasn't so terrifying after all.

I am not suggesting 'baby' and the 'demon' of my title are one and the same! My suggestion is that the phenomenon of the shadow of a prospect is often far worse than the reality it represents.

For months, I've been haunted by the prospect of disaster. Its shadow has loomed large. Yesterday, I met with someone who knew what they were talking about and we traced the shadow back to the reality that was casting it. The reality, whilst serious, is nowhere near as terrible as the shadow portrayed. The result is that I slept, last night, without torment.

There are often fears in your life, conjured up by the shadow of issues you've been afraid to face. May I suggest you find someone external to your situation - a friend, a professional, even a trusted stranger - who can see the source of the shadow for what it is, and help you find peace. The shadow of the demon may be far more terrifying than the fear you have demonised.

I remember Jerry Savelle talking about his frustration over an unanswered prayer. He just couldn't break through and the circumstances said that his faith was not working. Kenneth Copeland said one line to Jerry that burned into my consciousness and has stayed with me ever since:

The shadow of a dog never bit anyone!

Don't let your peace be robbed by the shadow of anything - dog, demon, or even the fear of parenthood! Find the source and see it in its true light, then tame the beast!

Neil
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.


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