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Five Ways to Wellbeing - Take Notice Friday May 3, 2019

So taking notice is always something I've believed I am good at. I think I notice things around me, but often with a negative bias. What I mean is if there is the potential for something to go wrong in a situation I usually tune into this rather than what can go right. Yes, I'm a glass half empty person quite a lot of the time.

If the wind is blowing hard (as it seems to have been rather a lot lately!) I'll notice the bough of the huge Elm tree in the park overhanging the house next door and wonder when it will fall on the roof causing tiles to be misplaced and necessitating repairs. Others would no doubt just think thank goodness the tree's not yet got leaves on it to act as a sail in the strong winds.

So noticing is definitely something I do, but perhaps it needs a little shift? The third of the 5 ways to wellbeing is Take Notice. With this in mind I'm trying to be as aware of my surroundings but in a more positive way. The weather today is damp and grey my least favourite, but instead of focusing on that, I'm thinking the damp, wet weather is necessary for longer term benefit, that without the damp, new spring bulbs won't grow and flower, the grass in the park will be yellow and patchy like last year.

As I write this I'm taking notice of all around me - using my senses and thinking about what I notice in a deliberate way. 'I'm enjoying the moment' and appreciating the environment I find myself in. Most obviously I'm using my eyes and seeing the flowers in my window box their delicate heads and petals buffeted by the breeze. Blown about but not broken off. My ears can hear the shrill screech of the gulls that wheel and cry over head at all hours of daylight here. The lingering smell of garlic and chilli from my lunch hangs in the air, reminding me of the spicy taste too. Finally the feel of the dense and warm fur of the cat who is snuggled up beside me as I type. So my senses are being well used today as I take notice.

How about you? Are you scurrying along the street, smart phone in hand reading a text or email, staring distractedly? Or are you out for a refreshing purposeful stroll; tuning in to your environment, the changing seasons, the bird song, the new take away at the end of the road?

Whatever you take notice of today, consider if its beneficial. What's that expression - whatever you pay attention to grows.

Ellie
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to leave a comment below.


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