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Are our mental health issues being treated appropriately? Tuesday June 4, 2019


I have been pondering recently on medication for mental health issues.

There are almost as many different medications as for types of mental health issues. It's a minefield out there and it seems that it's trial and error (mainly error) over a number of years to find the right medication for you.

Some of us never find it. Other swear that their new medication works for their depression, bi polar etc etc.

I am really happy when I read on Moodscope and press articles that someone who has suffered depression, whatever form it takes, for years, has found a tablet which makes them better. I don't doubt it. I'm just pleased. Very pleased for this person.

I read an article recently, written by Alastair Campbell, political journalist and former ministerial aide whom many of you in the UK will know has suffered from depression for years. He wrote honestly about how his depression affects him. All very interesting but the thing that struck me most in his article was his mention of his Psychiatrist. His Psychiatrist prescribed his latest medication which is working wonders for him.

Now how many of us lesser mortals can afford a psychiatrist? Honestly? And how do we find one on the NHS or even privately? How can we afford to see one privately anyway?

I have a friend who is a psychiatrist who lives in another European country who has advised me that I should not expect my GP to prescribe antidepressant as GPs are not trained in the different formulations of these medications and cannot taylor them to us individually. We should instead seek the advice from a trained Psychiatrist.

What she told me makes enormous sense. She actually said it was dangerous to get antidepressants from our primary care provider or could be.

The point of my blog is that I feel in the UK (it could be different in other countries and I'd like to hear) depression/insomnia etc is not treated properly.

Whenever I've felt I needed antidepressants, I've gone to my GP and asked him for a certain brand. Who knows if its components are suitable for my physical make up? Certainly, none of the ones I've tried, and I've tried many, have worked for me.

Who knows if I am really depressed or insomnia causes depression? I do! I know that my insomnia causes my depression but doctors have always persuaded me otherwise that my depression causes insomnia. Not so!

My psychiatrist friend tells me I must get my sleeping issues dealt urgently with by my GP first and then if I'm still depressed (doubtful), I should see a psychiatrist to prescribe the correct medication for my particular depression.

So that's the path I am taking but believe me, asking my GP to prescribe a course of strong sleeping tablets has been an uphill struggle. I felt like a drug addict begging for Methadone. I am sure it would be easier to get Methadone.

I'd like to hear about your experiences of trying to find the right medication (not alternative therapies) that has worked for you or are you still trying to get the correct treatment?

Julia
A Moodscope Member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.


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