The Moodscope Blog

25

July

In the face of rejection. Tuesday July 25, 2017

Today I received an email from an old friend. I had written to her the night before to ask after her as we hadn't spoken for about a year and I wondered if she was feeling so bad that she didn't feel able to contact me as she suffers from (unacknowledged) depression. I tried to contact her several times before but had no answer.

The response came as a surprise and a shock. Not only was it a rejection (Please don't contact me again etc): but it was written in such a way as to have no regard for my feelings. There is honest and there is brutal. This hurt me more than her telling me that she didn't want to know me any more – something I had suspected.

It was really unnecessary to address me in such a blunt and uncaring way and it put into question what over 12 years of friendship had been about. She said that we no longer have anything in common, but for me difference is something that can make a relationship more interesting so that's not an issue. Friends are very important to me, as I don't have a partner, children or much close family so the loss of one of my social group can really affect me.

I could say to myself that it's her depression talking and that I had been valued as a friend in the past but I wonder if I was just a "project" for her as she was the "well" one and I the "mentally ill" when we first met.

I worry that she is such a loner now with few social contacts that no good can come of it but maybe that's just how she is – she prefers her own company as some people do.

So, now I have to let go not only of a person who meant something in my life but also of what the relationship meant – I can't know the reality of it as far as she is concerned. Can we ever be sure of how people feel and think about us? I doubt it. As my therapist said; really, we are all alone.

I will try not to take the rejection personally as that will only do me more harm. So, it's up to me to be a better friend to myself than she has been – I deserve that and at least I'm going to stick around for the rest of my life.

Meggle
A Moodscope member

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

45 comments - Permalink


24

July

Lessons from a Burlesque Dancer. Monday July 24, 2017

Meetings and more meetings. Not always fun. But often necessary. How delightful, then, to attend an excellent business networking meeting and discover that one of the guest speakers was sharing lessons for business from Burlesque.

There was much laughter that morning at The Boardroom Network in Bournemouth, and rightly so. Three 'volunteers' were roped in to modelling what Abi was teaching us. Her message was around the impact we can have when we enter the room. Shoulders hunched just doesn't give the right message!

In case you're about to switch off, thinking to yourself, "Lex, I don't do networking – or even attend meetings," Abi's message was about how to have more joie de vivre – more joy in every moment... and, perhaps, in every movement!

Over years of coaching, I've become convinced that our physical 'position' affects our mental 'position'. I'm also convinced that the two are inextricably connected. Change the body, change the mind; change the mind, change the body! (Hey, high heels make a difference, don't they?)

I was, therefore, very open to Abi's insights. There were three top tips:

1 Posture. Stand tall – chin up, shoulders relaxed – open posture makes you look confident and approachable (and I'd argue it makes you feel that way too!) I can feel a Val Doonican song coming on... "Walk tall, walk straight, and look the World right in the eye..." https://youtu.be/BL58-Sh94ms

2 Eye Contact. A difficult balance between connection and seduction (well, if you decide to do Burlesque!) Eyes-wide-open gives a message of innocence and honesty! This is one of the reasons I am uncomfortable with people who won't take their sunglasses off.

But the real reason I wanted to write this blog was because of Abi's third and final tip...

3 The Shimmy! This is a moving of the shoulders - not up and down (it's not 'shrugging') but rather forwards and backwards. This was hilarious (as you can check out in the video link) and I'm pretty sure I will never do it, but her point was compelling: never let a day go by without having a shimmy! It'll make you laugh, it'll make anybody who see you doing it laugh, and business as well as life can get a whole lot better with a shimmy.

Now, since I'm becoming to know some of you better over the years, I can guess now who's going to have a go at doing a shimmy right now!!!

And for those who want the whole Shack to Shimmy when everyone's movin' around and around – here's a link to the Love Getaway: https://youtu.be/9SOryJvTAGs Trust me, shimmying to this is great fun!

To see Abi's presentation, follow this YouTube link!

https://youtu.be/pqyZZzloX-k

Shimmy!

Lex
A Moodscope member.

[And please let me know what adventures you get up to!]

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

36 comments - Permalink


23

July

A friend of dorothy. Sunday July 23, 2017

Three years ago this week I got up to go to the loo, as usual in total darkness. I took one step too many. An hour later I was in hospital awaiting surgery, hip broken in two places, extensive soft tissue injuries.

I opted to stay awake during the operation, so soon afterwards was fit to move onto the main ward. Still in shock and exhausted, I wanted to be left in peace.

“Oh here’s a nice lady for me to talk to, hello my duck!” came from the next bed.

“Just my luck” I thought. And indeed it was.

Dorothy was 92, and had been in and out of hospital for weeks due to a hip that refused to heal. I need not have worried that I was not up to talking, she talked more than enough for both of us. The nurses loved her. She had visitors waiting for space beside her bed. Among them her daughter, who had been alone for many years following her divorce. Now she was about to remarry, a lovely man who adored her. The wedding was days away, and there was no way that Dorothy would be able to attend.

I could not help but overhear the conversation, the daughter insisting she could not get married without her Mum being present, they would postpone it.

Dorothy’s response was as far removed from how my own spiteful, self-obsessed mother would have behaved in those circumstances as you could get.

“You have been a wonderful daughter to me, and a wonderful mother to your own family. Now it’s your turn for some happiness. Nothing will make me happier than to lie here knowing you are marrying that lovely man. We will celebrate again when I’m back home, but don’t you dare cancel!”

By the second day I had to hold a pillow against my broken ribs, I was laughing so much at her stories.

We stayed in touch for the remaining 18 months of her life. I wish I had known her longer, but am so grateful I ever knew her at all. I used to joke that I needed to request an audience, she had so many visitors. They say if you want to be a nice old person, you need to start practising when you are young. She had not had an easy life, suffered much sadness and illness. Yet not one word of self-pity crossed her lips,and the harshest criticism of others was “The least said about them the better”

Her last words were “I think I could manage a cup of tea”

It was standing room only at the funeral. She was such a good and decent woman, a kindly Christian in the real sense of the word. I look at her photo every day, kiss her dear face.

Have you had inspiration from an ordinary person, met someone who left a deep impression on you, showed you the true meaning of humanity?

Valerie.
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

26 comments - Permalink


22

July

Walk a mile in my shoes. Saturday July 22, 2017

Can you really understand me after walking a 1.60 kilometres (one mile) in my shoes?

When I was a child my parents said you shouldn't judge someone until you have walked a mile in their shoes. This prompted questions, what if they don't have shoes, what if their shoes are too big or too small for me. I used to look at people's shoes and wonder what it would to wear big clown shoes or dainty ballerina shoes.

AS I grew older I understood the metaphor but have wondered how much understanding and empathy we get when walk in another's shoes.

Lately there have been reality TV shows and fundraising challenges that involve trying to understand another's plight. There is a television show where rich people spend ten days living like a homeless person. I think while these programs give people a chance to see how other people experience life do people really know what being homeless is like after one night spent outside or 7 days on the street. Reality programs rarely have anything to do with reality. For a rich person to spend 7 days roughing it, when they know they will soon be home in their mansion with indoor heating a heated pool and housekeepers.

These experiences may give us some insights but that is all.

People have said to me they know all about bipolar because a close relative/ friend has bipolar.

There was a week challenge for fundraising where people had to eat the rations given to united nations refugees for one week. A woman told me she now knew what is what like to feel hunger and she understood what the refugees experience. In one week is it possible to know what a person living on this ration really feels and experience.

I am now rethinking how useful is the statement walk a mile in my shoes.

Is it arrogant or even patronising to think we can know what another person's experiences in a short time?

Do you think that is possible to walk a mile in someone's shoes to understand them?

Or does it take much more than a mile or a realty tv show to really empathise with another human?

Leah
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

72 comments - Permalink


21

July

"My Brain - It's my second favorite organ" Friday July 21, 2017

The title is a Woody Allen quote.

So, Brains - Here's what I know about Brains:

1) Brains love patterns. "Oooh, that's familiar," thinks Brain. "I know how to make things easier for myself - I will learn this pattern and repeat it at every opportunity." Very useful when you are learning to drive. Not so useful if you want to NOT be depressed. I, for example, have a habit of feeling sorry for myself, seeing myself as a victim. This validates my depression ("Oh poor me, my life is so hard, no wonder I feel depressed") thereby giving myself permission to keep on being depressed... Pretty dumb, eh? Brain doesn't think so - Brain thinks it's the smart, helpful thing to do...

2) It's not just patterns and habits that Brain is good at. It's good at SPOTTING things too. Good if you are a hunter-gatherer and want to see all the small red berries on the bush; less helpful if you wake up and think, "Hmmm, how do I feel today? I ache; I'm dizzy; nauseous; exhausted; feel really low..." Brain is good at spotting all those things. Try this: Ask Brain to look out for all the people wearing blue tops and suddenly, my goodness, nearly everybody seems to be wearing a blue top. What you focus on, you will see lots of - that is the power of Brain!

3) Telling Brain NOT to think about something, means that Brain will be constantly thinking about it. We all know that feeling. The more we say "I will NOT think about...", the more we think about it. Which, of course, also feeds into the patterns mentioned in point 1 and the 'spotting all the bad things' in point 2.

So are we all doomed to repetitive, negative thoughts? NO!

Firstly, I have come to accept that the state of the inside of my head is MY responsibility. I can rant and rail and blame the Fates, the Government, my ex, the weather... but ultimately the only person choosing what I am thinking about is me.

If I want to experience periods of contentment, I have to prepare the ground for that. I have to recognise the patterns Brain tries to make me follow and shout "STOP!" I have to think about GOOD stuff, because then Brain gets good at spotting it and does it as a pattern.

Unlike Woody Allen, my Brain is actually my FAVOURITE organ. I know three things about the Brain. Remember those things. Apply them to your life - reject the patterns that are not helpful; look for the Good (it's everywhere once you start looking); don't say "Don't...." (ha ha) just notice all the good things, fill your Brain with them. And then keep at it...

At first my depression was a black, cold prison made of rough, grey breeze blocks; no windows, no doors; totally dark in there. "Looking for the good" created a tiny chink of light. With persistence that chink grew to be a crack, and recently several bricks actually fell out and I have a glimpse of freedom! (It's very colourful and light out there!)

I am not belittling the seriousness or severity of our various states of mental health, nor am I denying the impact that they have on our lives, I am just offering something to the Moodscope community that has helped me. Please try it and see. Look around you now - what can you see, taste, smell, hear, feel or even just remember that is GOOD?

Marmalade Girl
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

53 comments - Permalink


20

July

Never alone. Thursday July 20, 2017

This is my first attempt at writing. I've always wanted to but never had the courage. So here goes...

I'm actually a qualified therapist. I've been following Moodscope for some time, partly for professional reasons, and also for personal support. I particularly enjoy reading other people's blogs – the thoughts, perceptions and struggles are so amazingly unique and yet so common to many. I find the creative words, articles and insights a real encouragement and inspiration.

Recently I've felt overwhelmed – some issues in life have felt like huge injustices, in worldly terms, and also in personal terms, and in facing my responses to these, I've hit a real low.

I've had to face my own feelings head on – why do I struggle so much with being heard, with having a voice, with feelings of 'What's the point' and of feeling so alone? One evening, I even felt like I wanted to die. No, I wasn't really wanting to die; I just wanted the internal struggle with myself and my feelings to end – they just felt too overwhelming. I had nothing left and I felt so useless and empty.

All I could do that evening was cry. My loving husband so kindly just held me. I had no words.

I shared honestly the next day with my supervisor about where I was at, and she empathically shared how it felt like chunks were being taken out of me in some way. I broke and cried deeply again. I felt heard, emotionally held and understood, and this in turn helped to lift my mood and my heart. I've since gathered my thoughts and decided I will give myself some time to tend to my heart, put in some healthier boundaries, respect myself more, and hold my head up high. Life will go on. All will be well.

I'm being very brave in sharing this – firstly, because I struggle so much to speak up and speak out, and secondly, because as a therapist, maybe I shouldn't feel like this and expose my struggle so publicly.

However, I do this to give myself an opportunity to share my voice, to be heard in (what I perceive to be) a supportive community, and to show that therapists are human too. We all struggle with different things at different times of life.

What I love about Moodscope is - it's 'Ok' to be real and it's ok to be honest. And there are others that care. It's comforting to know that I am never alone.

Thank you for all being there.

Maggie Jane
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

43 comments - Permalink


19

July

Just Like Herding Cats Wednesday July 19, 2017

[To hear an audio version of this blog please click here: http://bit.ly/2u5vew4]

There is a wonderful advertisement that can be found on Youtube, http://bit.ly/2usTpVI featuring a team of cowboys (or possibly catboys) driving a herd of cats across the American Plains. Of course, it's ridiculous and amusing, but the more times you watch it, the more you admire the people who put it together. There is the sneezing catboy with the allergies, the one rerolling a large ball of yarn, the one with a lint roller...

It has been a bit like that for my daughter as she (and her long-suffering father) attempt to organise fifty (no – forty-eight, make that fifty-one, fifty-three – no, we're back at forty-nine) sailing cadets for a week into twenty-five or so yachts and dinghies ensuring each boat has a competent helm and nobody sails too many times with someone they detest.

You may remember that she is the cadet commodore for the yacht club, and organising the activity week for the cadets is her primary duty for the year. It's quite a task for a fifteen-year-old.

The cadets range in age from suspiciously small "eight-year olds" to the hulking sixteen year olds who are more interested in looking cool than in helping the littlies. The sailing craft range from an Oyster Smack which could take almost any number of cadets to the little Toppers which are single-handed dinghies.

Then there are the adults.

There must be sufficient safety boats to ensure all sailing cadets are looked after. The owners of the yachts who have kindly volunteered their craft and sailing expertise for the week must be managed and mollified and made to feel appreciated. The mothers of the cadets must be made to feel useful.

Because everyone "just wants to help" and it's driving my poor daughter to screaming point. They all want to help in their own way, doing things they think need doing in the way they think things should be done. She's organised it already and they are disrupting it all!

Herding cats would be easier. But she's learning the subtle art of delegation. And stress-management.

I will have this to a lesser extent. I am merely feeding the eleven cadets who are on our side of the river. I have sorted out a menu, created a shopping list and budget and I will know exactly what to do and at what time to have a hot meal on the table at exactly five o'clock each day, so they can eat, turn around and head back over the river for the evening activities.

But I know I will be inundated with offers of "help". Because people like to help. People like to feel useful.

So, rather than growl at them to go away and let me get on with it, I am thinking up tasks which can be usefully delegated. I can ask my "helpers" to prepare salads, to peel potatoes, to roll seventy-two meatballs.

I am trying to decide if it's fair to ask them to peel onions.

Mary
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

10 comments - Permalink


18

July

When is a house a home? Tuesday July 18, 2017



Our children were born in this house – we would probably be there still, but it's under the M25.

In 2003 (in UK) I wrote an article entitled 'Home, Sweet Home' in response to an excellent sermon given by our priest, a New Zealander.

We were about to leave our country of birth, England, our country of adoption, France, to go to a country of poverty and much homelessness, India.

A daughter was in Qatar, among strangers, at some danger then. Another son and family lived in Australia. So where IS the gathering place for our family? Has to be the one with the biggest house in reasonably easy reach of road, boat or plane.

Many emigrants to the Antipodes talked of going 'home' to the UK, even second generations born there. My mother used to talk of dying as 'going home', and one's final resting place is subject to much debate.

Our roots are well spread; we are not a family with a claim to fame, so that our graves would not be visited by strangers. By common consent in the family the parish where we were married, five children baptised, one daughter married, and where my mother lies under an ancient oak seemed the likeliest place, so we are 'booked in' via a faculty from the diocese.

But as people are more mobile, and live longer, to get ourselves carted expensively from one country to another to be buried next to Mum is not really practical. Lots of ex-pats are cremated then their ashes returned to whatever passes as the family plot, or where they were born. But we don't like cremation. Morbid thoughts, maybe, but like wills somebody has to do them so not to leave a mess.

In England, sadly, because of wild property fluctuations, a 'home' is less a centre of family love and comfort than a way of making money. In the sermon our priest said his reminder of home was people and atmosphere. To me, it is warmth, a beautiful cat, loads of books, and an ever open door to friends and strangers alike. The French call it 'a corner to cry in'.

How do YOU see 'home'?

The Gardener
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

29 comments - Permalink


17

July

What If Life Was A Computer Game? Monday July 17, 2017

Fret not if you're not into computer games! I've only dabbled at a distance myself but I get the whole 'Levels' thing – the need to see if you can beat your personal best time after time. It can be utterly compelling... almost addictive!

I once introduced the New Age Guru, Deepak Chopra, at the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development's conference. He made us all laugh with a post-lunch witticism. His quip was, "Good afternoon, and, for those of you who believe in reincarnation, welcome back!"

Whilst I don't believe in reincarnation, I love the idea of it. The chance to learn, and grow, and evolve over multiple lifetimes. A longer time-frame to get it right.

Personally, I find Life far too complicated. Sometimes, I just have to simplify the way I approach it.

With this in mind, I applied the 'Levels' concept to the skill levels I wanted to master before moving on to a higher stage in my life. This gives me focus.

As soon as I thought about it like a computer game, with levels ascending to completion, the first three levels became clear. I want to begin with mastering hope, then faith, and then love.

Hope, because it gives us a bright future – something to move towards. There have been many times in my life when I felt devoid of hope. I never want to go there again! To begin with, then, I focus on creating a positive vision of the future – every day. And, if I can instil this in others too, I would consider that as completing that level, allowing me to move up to Level 2!

Level 2 is to do with belief in myself, in the best in others, and in a friendly and abundant Universe. That's a tough level!

Level 3 is to move only in love – 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year.

I'm still on Level 1!

Now, over to you. What levels would you like to master in your own life?

Lex
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

59 comments - Permalink


16

July

What colour are you? Sunday July 16, 2017

I am blue. Blue is often used to describe mood. The implication is that you feel low and despondent. (I have felt like that recently).

I am a navy blue, which is what a British navy officer's uniform would be. French navy is a different shade of blue. It isn't a wispy-washy faded blue, but darker. Sometimes the sea is this colour, a rich, dark hue.

The pop-group, The Moody Blues, used the colour to give an impression of the moody music they created. A classification of popular music is The Blues, a type of jazz-rock?

Navy blue eyes are rarely spoken of, but perhaps it denotes a deep blue colour, which could turn grey under certain mood changes.

I am contented to have been made this deep, rich blue. Contentment and self-acceptance go together. I am always aiming at the latter as it is a good springing-board towards energy and growth.

I am already beginning to feel the upsurge of energy as I reflect on these thoughts.

Zareen
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

31 comments - Permalink


15

July

Do you have a story to tell? Saturday July 15, 2017

Moodscope is currently looking for members who would like to write a blog for the Moodscope web site.

If you have a story to tell, some advice to give or an experience to share, start writing! Please send your contribution to support@moodscope.com.

We don't have many rules, but we do ask that your blog is 500 words or less and we prefer to steer clear of political or religious blogs.

If you have an idea and are not sure whether it's suitable, just ask us to take a look and we'll let you know.

All contributions will be reviewed and may be edited if necessary before publishing.

We'll let you know when we're sending your blog out so that you can reply to member's comments if you wish.

Time to start writing…

Kind regards.

Caroline Ashcroft
The Moodscope Team

Thoughts on the above or any questions? Please feel free to post a comment below.

15 comments - Permalink


14

July

Masterpiece in Progress: Friday July 14, 2017



What do you see in this painting? A woman half finished or half complete?

Her hair shiny and curling around her nearly complete face. Pretty features in contrast with her blurred eye. The bodice of her dress sculpted around her body, highlights her unfinished arms behind her back.

With no art expertise, but, perhaps Dali was meant to leave this painting unfinished?

It's a fine example how masterpiece and work in progress can exist simultaneously. It doesn't matter that this was once a blank canvas or how this painting was first thought of or started. It's past is of no consequence to what we see now. Dali is long gone, this work will never be completed and does it matter? Right now the incompleteness is just as beautiful and relevant as the areas that we see painted.

Life might feel incomplete sometimes and that we have our hands tied behind our back. That we still have a lot of work to do and things to achieve before we feel whole.

But before the judgement and critique, take a step back and look. Observe the muse you see: that was, that is and that will be all at the same time. See the beauty in your own defined areas of experience and appreciate the mystery and wonder of the areas that are less clear. Each influence and inform one another and work together to create your whole picture.

Accept and embrace your own knowing and unknown because nobody is the finished article until they leave this earth. Seal off the cynicism of the outside world that defines time and ideas of when and how life should happen.

If Dali succumbed to outside pressures we'd be looking at a different painting, perhaps a far less interesting one.

You are your own creator and artist. The masterpiece is you and where you are now, this minute, this hour, this day. We are all works in progress and masterpiece at the same time. Even our undiscovered, undefined areas matter because they contribute to the intrigue to the creation that is you.

Choose tools and brushstrokes carefully. Step back and observe the whole of you. Note how to develop and change the technique if the desired tools and effect are not working. Persevere and progress with the masterpiece because it is not finished, until the final brush stroke.

The trusty-yogi
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

13 comments - Permalink


13

July

Rumination. Thursday July 13, 2017

My favourite thing - ruminating. Did I say the right thing? Did I say the wrong thing? Was that person a bit 'off' with me today? Does that other person not care about me anymore? Do people like me? Or maybe they just tolerate me? Why hasn't he/she texted me back? Have I upset them? Should I have done this? Should I have done that? Blah blah blah my mind goes, all day long...

Stop! Enough already!

I read somewhere that 'We should try to wear the world as a loose cloak.' I'm not sure where I read this, or who penned it first, but I like this quote. I try very hard sometimes to visualise a colourful cloak billowing behind me. It works for a very short while then the anxiety, worry and yes, rumination, all come flooding back. At this point I feel safer donning Harry Potter's cloak of invisibility.

Around 99 per cent of what I worry about never happens and is purely in my imagination. So how do I stop? Do you ruminate often? How will you stop yourself from ruminating today?

Jane SG
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

30 comments - Permalink


12

July

Do it Your Way. Wednesday July 12, 2017

[To listen to an audio version of this blog please follow this link: http://bit.ly/2uMDUG3]

I have heard, from some source or another, that Frank Sinatra's "I Did It My Way" is the most popular choice of song for funerals; especially those funerals not held in church. Apparently, it beats, by a short head, Monty Python's "Always Look on the Bright Side of Life."

But this is not a blog about funerals, but about life and how to make it better.

We were all sitting around the table, as we do every first Wednesday of the month; the bipolar group to which I belong.

We had just finished a spirited discussion on medication. As most of us hold to the opinion that bipolar disorder is a physical condition with mental symptoms, most of us are on medication of one sort or another.

"But we cannot rely just on medication, can we?" said the leader of our group, in his velvety and deliciously accented voice (I could listen to that man talk all day, I tell you). "What do we do on those days when we wake up but do not want to get up and face the day? What do we do to help us stay healthy?"

Of course, there were as many answers as folk around the table, multiplied many times. Some of our answers were duplicated and no doubt we just touched the tip of the possible answers out there.

"I write a list," said Shelley. "When I've done anything – even just had a shower – I tick it off my list, and draw little flowers around it. That makes me feel I have achieved something."

"I go out into the garden," said Peter. "I walk round and see what's growing. I do some weeding and make it tidy. That makes me feel better."

"I sing," said Lynne. "I sing with a choir when I am well enough. But when I am not well enough to go and join my choir, then I sing in my living room. I turn the music up loud and I dance and I sing – and to hell with the neighbours!"

"I like my 80's rock music," said Ash, in that voice. "The louder the better."

"And Wagner for me," I said, in my turn. "I agree, loud is good."

"I paint."

"I make birdboxes in my shed."

"I write."

"I go for long walks, whatever the weather."

What was clear is that there is no one size fits all method of coping with the black dog. Each of us responds differently to his presence and each of us has a different method of coping. But each of us gained much from listening to the ideas of others.

So, my invitation to you today, is please, even if you do not normally comment, click through with your suggestions or experiences. What works for you, if anything? Because sometimes we know it gets so bad that all you can do is to hang on.

But if you can water your hanging baskets while there, that's great.

Mary
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

60 comments - Permalink


11

July

Self harm. Tuesday July 11, 2017

I have been a member of Moodscope for a while and have found some comfort in accessing this website.

Today I stretch out for more comfort, please can I have a double dose.

I am a parent (mother) to a young man (19 yrs old), who is a severe self harmer. Severe is putting it politely.

He has been in a secure hospital for a number of years and I have lost count of the amount of hospital admissions and operations he has had.

As a parent, thinking you are going to have to say good bye to your beautiful and troubled son is in describable. I thought the first time would be the worst but I was proved wrong. Every time is a trauma.

I now sit here as he is waiting for news of another operation - he has damaged his arm so badly that he has lost use of it and they are deciding whether to operate to repair it or remove the arm - a trauma in itself.

I do not want sympathy but I do need wise words to try and work through the above and continue to be the mum I am.

I'm not a victim, I'm a survivor but today a struggling one.


Michelle x
A Moodscope user.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

33 comments - Permalink


10

July

The Wizard of Time. Monday July 10, 2017

In my forthcoming Time Management workshops, I can safely predict that participants will express a desire to:

· 'make more time'

· 'find more time' and

· 'get more time'

I used to make the mistake of correcting these as what I saw as misunderstanding of the nature of Time. I'd gently tease, "What, are you a Wizard? Can you create or make Time?" – in a good-humoured way, of course!

Then I'd look under the tables and chairs and explain that I was trying to find more time. On a good day, the attendees would laugh.

I suppose I could have opened my prop – a Pirate's Chest – and pretended to get more time out of it too – for Time really is one of the greatest treasures.

My point, even though it was in error, is that we could only 'Take Time' – by planning in advance and 'taking time aside' dedicated to what we wanted to achieve.

As with so many matters, I now have to eat humble pie and admit I'm wrong. You can make more time, you can find more time, and you can get more time – if you become a Wizard.

Today's blog is about sharing magic and becoming magicians and wizards together because I know that I know that I know that you have a ton of time-saving tips you've learned the hard way over the years. This is my invitation to share them!

Time is this wonderfully fair resource. The richest person on Earth has 168 hours a week to enjoy and the poorest person on Earth equally has 168 hours to invest. Time is no respecter of persons. The difference that makes a difference is our choices.

Wendy Cope captured this in her wonderfully perceptive poem: "Bloody Men!"

[http://bit.ly/2tXYm8K]

This means that making time, finding time, and getting more time comes down to decisions on what to do with our time – how to spend it – which bus to catch.

To open the time of sharing, these are the time-saving techniques I've applied over the years – techniques that have given me more time to spend on other activities.

1) Develop memory skills – so that I don't waste time looking for stuff, or letting people down forgetting things.

2) Learn to touch-type – this has changed the speed at which I can capture, edit, and the disseminate my thoughts with my friends like you!

3) Master Mind Mapping – those strange spider diagrams invented by Tony Buzan. I found that learning to structure my thinking with a Mind Map saved me so much time and stress that I almost bought the company (I became one of their trainers).

4) Get comfortable with saying, "No!" because saying, "Yes!" to anything really means saying, "No!" to something else – simply because there isn't enough time to do everything.

Would you share your tips and techniques too? I'd like to find, save, make, and get more time, and I hope you'll help!

Lex
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

27 comments - Permalink


9

July

Through the glass. Sunday July 9, 2017

Here I am swimming round and round, watching all the swirly green and pink stuff in my bowl swish by.

Eyes popping, orange tail speeding me along as I hustle and bustle for some attention and flakes of fine food that occasionally gets sprinkled into the water, swirling like sun kissed jewels in the shaft of sunlight that lights up some of the dark waters I live in.

It is these specks of light that I swim towards, the delight and luxury of being bathed in the warmth and light that slants dancing in a beam and brightens my mood, on days like this I could swim for miles, do a sassy little dance in front of the He fish and never want for much more.

But then there are the dark days the days that the sun does not shine, the days when swimming is a necessity as is the constant search for food that often I let slip past me and sink to the bottom of the tank unwanted.

My orange tail is slower on these days, life is aimless and my head is full of listlessness and my large eyes can barely look out of the glass walls at the world outside.

Occasionally some child will tap on the glass and point squealing with delight at the sight of me and my fish friends all caught, wide eyed in the loneliness of our existence.
The mother will often tell them not to tap on the glass as it will scare us, so then they press their chubby cheeks hard to the glass instead and stare and stare quite rudely.

If only they knew that once they have turned away from the glass they will take steps from their childhood and their lives will change as they grow and become nothing more than fish in a sea of the busy world, sometimes happy in their beams of warm light and sometimes alone in the darkness of it all.

It's so very hard to keep swimming sometimes.

Wouldn't it just be so much easier to not?

But then just as I am prepared to let go and stop this endless circling, breathe out my last bubbles and sink to the bottom of the gloom, I see a small beam of sunshine begin to filter in the water ahead, it gets brighter and there are the diamonds once more floating down the now bright yellow beam, I long to feel once more the warmth and bathe in the light.

With one great swish of orange I surge towards it eyes full of fishy tears.

Jayne
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

13 comments - Permalink


8

July

Holiday dilemma. Saturday July 8, 2017

I opened my U3A (University of The Third Age) Newsletter, perused it, and found out that the group I used to go to was restarting. The tutor, it said, had had some health issues, but with the help of members of the group, it could run again.

I was cheered by this as it is fun, thought-provoking and educative. Three of the elements I hold dear. I seem to need this stimulation for optimum mental health, as well as the easy sociability that comes with being part of a group that has the same interest.

We recently returned from a three week holiday, and I wasn't thrilled either to be away, or with the destination. Which was odd, as many people would have jumped at the opportunity: "How fortunate you are. Three whole weeks!"

But, for me, it lacked interest. Yes, the weather was nice. Yes, it was relaxing. Yes, the people we knew from previous stays there were friendly and eager to meet. But I just couldn't work up enthusiasm and became stultified. I didn't know how to fill the yawning gap of the afternoon after breakfast, shopping at the market and lunch were over. I took to reading, but fell asleep over my book. Falling asleep after a good night's sleep? Surely I didn't need the extra hour? And I felt guilty, because this holiday was costing us good money!

It is only since getting home that I've put two and two together, and identified that these were not my ideal conditions (though my husband has no such qualms, he loves doing nothing on holiday.) So it is a dichotomy. Who to please?

Do you ever have this problem with a holiday?

What are the key ingredients for a successful trip where you are concerned?

I recognise that the break HAS done me good, but would've liked to have enjoyed it more while I was there!

I would be interested to hear how others feel about holidays.

Sally
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

15 comments - Permalink


7

July

My blog. Friday July 7, 2017

If I could change one thing about myself what would it be?

I am only allowed one thing. That would be impossible as there is so much I want to change. How do you choose just one single thing? Do I select something easy and physical and say I want to be taller or thinner - no that would sound so superficial and I think I am so deep and meaningful.

Do I choose one of my annoying behaviours, the way I sometimes pick at my food, eat with my fingers, leave a lot of water on the floor after my shower or not close the fridge properly. Changing all those behaviours would make my partner happy, but I am not sure they are worthy of my one chance to change myself.

What do I want to change and why do I think I should change because people have told me I should improve some aspect of my personality?

So, Leah just pick one thing. It is not that hard I told myself.

I would like to change my indecisive nature. As you can see I find it hard to answer a simple question. When I am depressed, deciding is nearly impossible for me - I would like to be a decisive person who can make important and unimportant decisions by weighing up the pros and cons and then making up a decision. Also, I don't want to feel guilty later. Is that more than one thing?

Now your turn to answer.

If I could change one thing about myself what would it be?

Or complete 'I wouldn't change a thing about myself because...

Leah
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

68 comments - Permalink


6

July

Time is the key. Thursday July 6, 2017

"Everything happens for a reason." Does it? I noted someone mentioning that in a response a few weeks ago, it prickled my skin and then a week or so ago the thought for the day on the bottom of the email was "Someday, everything will make perfect sense so for now, laugh at the confusion, smile through the tears and keep reminding yourself that everything happens for a reason."

I riled, if everything happens for a reason why did my father in law and then dad die in such horrible ways, why did the recent terrorist attacks and fire devastate our country?

My current view is that there is no reason, things just happen, there are no fates pulling the strings to lead us upon a predestined path. We have to deal with life as it unfolds and there is no reason behind it or ahead.

I have previously thought that when folks used that expression it indicated that although something awful had happened something good would come of it. I suppose that the recent outpouring of love and kindness is a result of the attacks and fire. Does that justify the events? Not at all, but at least there is some positive in the aftermath from a distance. I can't imagine though that the families who lost their loved ones will feel much comfort or understand the reason.

I certainly don't get that there can be a positive reason going forward from my dad's suffering, it was an awful 3 months and a similarly awful death.

After a bit of time I realise that the reason may pertain to the past rather than the future, both my dad and my father in law might have died because of choices they made or health status. The terrorists acted because of their beliefs. The fire... well... Are those the reasons? Maybe? I don't like it but I accept this past reasoning much more than my former understanding of an implied future.

I am pleased to have spent the time thinking through these various possibilities, I still hold with my view, but maybe I understand other views a little more?

Have you come to appreciate something differently with a little time? What do you think of reasons?

Eva
A Moodscope member.

Thoughts on the above? Please feel free to post a comment below.

24 comments - Permalink


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